Positivity challenge: experiment, practice, observe, take note

What if we experiment with influence of positivity? What if feedback to learners identifies details of strengths exhibited as well as areas for growth in a 3:1 ratio?  How might we enhance motivation and productivity? How might we influence opportunities to flourish?

<In a whisper…shh…>
Umm…What if I don’t know how? How do I start? My written feedback has been “great job” and “needs improvement.”
</whisper>

What language gets to more growth oriented feedback that enhances motivation, creativity, and productivity?

Let’s mashup Design Thinking feedback and the Art of Questioning…Think of it as a recipe for feedback power writing.

Start with I like…because…, then use I wonder…, and then What if… as the wrap-up.

Starting with I like indicates that there is value in what is observed. Using because adds detail to describe/indicate what is valuable.  I wonder can be used to indicate an area of growth demonstrated or an area of growth that is needed.  Both are positive; taking the time to write what you wonder indicates care, concern, and support.  Wrapping up with What if is invitational and builds relationship.

Move the fulcrum so that all the advantage goes to a negative mindset, and we never rise off the ground. Move the fulcrum to a positive mindset, and the lever’s power is magnified— ready to move everything up. (Achor, 65 pag.)

_________________________

Achor, Shawn (2010-09-14). The Happiness Advantage: The Seven Principles of Positive Psychology That Fuel Success and Performance at Work (Kindle Locations 947-948). Crown Publishing Group. Kindle Edition.

About jplgough

Learner, Love Questions, Problem-finding, Math w/technology. Interests: Collaborating, PLC, Formative assmt
This entry was posted in Assessment, Connecting Ideas, Learning, Questions and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Positivity challenge: experiment, practice, observe, take note

  1. Pingback: Feedback a la positivity – examples | Experiments in Learning by Doing

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s