All posts by jplgough

Learner, Love Questions, Problem-finding, Math w/technology. Interests: Collaborating, PLC, Formative assmt

How do we use the December exam as formative assessment? (TBT Remix)

“For assessment to function formatively, the results have to be used to adjust teaching and learning; thus a significant aspect of any program will be the ways in which teachers make these adjustments.”
Inside the Black Box: Raising Standards Through Classroom Assessment Black and Wiliam

How do students reflect on their work?  What opportunities are offered to help students carry the essential learnings from first semester through second semester and/or into the next level of learning?

I’m interested and curious about different strategies and methods used to help learners process and reflect on their exam experience and the accumulation of what they know.  Since each learner will have different bright spots and strengths, what strategies are used to differentiate for intervention and enrichment?

We aim to get “in the weeds” about reflection and intervention.  We want every child to reflect on what they could demonstrate well and where they need additional help.  We do not want them to move to the next year with any doubt or weakness if we can help now.  But, how do we know who needs help?  We collect data, and we let our learners gather data.  We need to be informed; they need to be informed.  We are a team working toward the goal of mastery or proficiency for all learners.

Our process:

  1. Return the exam to the learner on the first day back.
  2. Have each learner complete the exam analysis and reflection form (shown below) to identify strengths and areas of need.
        1. Circle the number of any missed problem.
        2. Begin, and possibly complete, correcting missed problems to review the material and determine if any error was a simple mistake or if more help is needed.
        3. Write a reflection about strengths, struggles, and goals.
        4. Report results on our team’s Google doc. (This is a copy; feel free to explore and “report” data to see how it feels. You can view the results here.)
  3. Meet in team to review all results and analyze for groups to design and provide necessary intervention and additional learning experiences.
  4. All assessments 2nd semester will have questions from first semester essential learnings to offer learners the opportunity to show growth and to help with retention.

We would love it if others would share methods and strategies for helping learners grow from an exam experience.  How do students reflect on their work?

What opportunities are offered to help students carry the essential learnings from first semester through second semester and/or into the next level of learning?


How do we use the December exam as formative assessment? was originally posted on January 4, 2012.

Doodling the C’s – Lesson 08: Explaining

How do we practice Information Age skills?  Which of the C’s do we actively engage with, share in the-struggle-to-learn with others, and intentionally insert into daily practice?

Creativity and innovation, Communication, Critical thinking and problem solving, Collaboration, …

Last week’s lesson was about observing.  Lesson 08 is about explaining.

Project:  What if we doodle to convey additional meaning for a learning progression?
  1. Select or write a new learning progression to highlight a pathway to success for a skill, topic, or process.
  2. Doodle to add additional information and/or meaning.

Remember… It takes practice.

  • Share your poster with someone and ask for feedback.
  • Scan or take a photo of your work and insert it in your Doodling the C’s Google doc, on your blog, or in your My Learning portfolio.
  • Bonus: Tweet a copy of your poster using the hashtags #LL2LU#ShowYourWork #TrinityLearns (or your school’s hashtag)

 

#TEDTalkTuesday: Voice and choice – young entrepreneurs

Beau Lotto + Amy O’Toole: Science is for everyone, kids included

Jack Andraka:  A promising test for pancreatic cancer … from a teenager

Cameron Herold: Let’s raise kids to be entrepreneurs

Lyrics and Improv – creating a flexible base

How many songs do we sing without reading and confirming the lyrics? How often have our lyrics been a source of enjoyment for others?

Be sure to make your instructional goals clear to your students.(Lehman and Roberts, 17 pag.)

Learning targets increase students’ independence by bringing the standards to life, shifting ownership of meeting them from just the teacher to both the teacher and the student. (Berger, 23 pag.)

It is not enough that the teacher knows where students are headed; the students must also know where they are headed, and both the teacher and the students must be moving in the same direction.  (Conzemius and O’Neill,  66 pag.)

Is it that, sometimes, what we hear isn’t really what is being said?

How often do we embrace improvisation?

While this may be a lesson introducing the steps of reading closely for text evidence, show [learners] how it can help them develop new ideas, like understanding their characters in deeper ways.  (Lehman and Roberts, 17 pag.)

Expectations that begin with the word “understand” are often especially good opportunities to connect the practices to the content. Students who lack understanding of a topic may rely on procedures too heavily. Without a flexible base from which to work, they may be less likely to consider analogous problems, represent problems coherently, justify conclusions, apply the mathematics to practical situations, use technology mindfully to work with the mathematics, explain the mathematics accurately to other students, step back for an overview, or deviate from a known procedure to find a shortcut. In short, a lack of understanding effectively prevents a student from engaging in the mathematical practices. (CCSS SMP)

How might we create a flexible base where we are moving in the same direction, singing the same tune, and confident enough to improvise?


Berger, Ron, Leah Rugen, and Libby Woodfin. Leaders of Their Own Learning: Transforming Schools through Student-engaged Assessment. N.p.: n.p., n.d. Print.

Conzemius, Anne; O’Neill, Jan. The Power of SMART Goals: Using Goals to Improve Student Learning. Bloomington, IN: Solution Tree, 2006. Print.

Lehman, Christopher, and Kate Roberts. Falling in Love with Close Reading: Lessons for Analyzing Texts and Life. N.p.: n.p., n.d. Print.

Standards for Mathematical Practice.” Standards for Mathematical Practice. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Dec. 2014.

 

Assessment of Assessment part 2 #LL2LU

Continuing to consider how we assess the quality of the assessments we use with our learners, I wonder what might happen if we take the time to learn more about and from the instruments and products of our work.

In Beyond the Common Core: A Handbook for Mathematics in a PLC at Work  written by Juli K. DixonThomasenia Lott AdamsEdward C. Nolan and edited by Timothy D. Kanold, they offer an Assessment Instrument Quality – Evaluation Tool and a High-Quality Assessment Diagnostic and Discussion Tool.

What if we, as a team, use similar tools to reflect and assess the quality of our assessments?

Last week, I began this conversation with one team to pilot a couple of items using their most recent assessment.  The draft of the first two items are shared in my previous post Assessment of Assessment #LL2LU. As strong, motivated learners, they asked about next steps and goal setting. (Wow! and Yay!!)

Here is a draft of the next two items I’ve selected  based on their request and desire to learn.

Balance of higher- and lower level- cognitive-demand tasks
What percentage of the assessment tasks are of higher-level cognitive demand? Have we, as a team, agreed on an appropriate balance?

Level 4
I can connect higher-level cognitive demand tasks to process learning progressions to support and motivate learning.

Level 3
I can collaboratively design an assessment that has the appropriate balance of age and grade appropriate higher-level and lower-level-cognitive-demand tasks.

Level 2
I can collaboratively determine the balance of age and grade appropriate higher-level and lower-level-cognitive-demand tasks include on our assessment.

Level 1
I can assess student learning using items identical to tasks completed in class.

Appropriate scoring rubric (points)
Are the scoring points assigned to each task appropriate and agreed upon by each teacher on the team? Are the point valued for every task clearly indicated on the assessment? Do our scoring rubrics  make sense based on the complexity of reasoning for each task?

Level 4
I can facilitate reflection and goal-setting for learners based on the areas of success and growth on the assessment.

Level 3
I can embed collaboratively assigned point values for each assessment item on the assessment.

Level 2
I can collaboratively assign point values to all assessment items prior to implementing the assessment.

Level 1
I can assign point values to all assessment items prior to implementing the assessment.

I am wowed by the engagement and interest in assessment and design. I am grateful for the time given and questions asked to help further my learning.

Co-learning in progress! More coming soon.


Dixon, Juli K; Adams, Thomasina Lott (2014-10-13). Beyond the Common Core: A Handbook for Mathematics in a PLC at Work™, Grades K-5 (Kindle Locations 720-722). Solution Tree Press. Kindle Edition.

Doodling the C’s – Lesson 07: Observing

How do we practice Information Age skills?  Which of the C’s do we actively engage with, share in the-struggle-to-learn with others, and intentionally insert into daily practice?

Creativity and innovation, Communication, Critical thinking and problem solving, Collaboration, …

Last week’s lesson was about reading and comprehension.  Lesson 07 is about observing.

Project:  Doodle as you observe.  Choose from 2 of the 3 choices listed below:
  1. Observe a colleague teach a lesson.  Doodle what you learn and notice.
  2. Sketch-note through a faculty meeting.
  3. Doodle the big ideas and salient points from a professional development session or workshop.

Remember… It takes practice.

  • Share your poster with someone and ask for feedback.
  • Scan or take a photo of your work and insert it in your Doodling the C’s Google doc, on your blog, or in your My Learning portfolio.
  • Bonus: Tweet a copy of your poster using the hashtags #ShowYourWork #TrinityLearns (or your school’s hashtag)

Suggestions:

  •  Observe another teacher.  Capture the teacher moves, essential learnings, student questions, and student actions.
  • Capture the big ideas from your next faculty meeting.
  • Illustrate the important points from a conference session or keynote.  Ask the speaker to sign your sketch-note.

Time, accuracy, speed, & precision (TBT Remix)

It is critical that we take a moment to review the emerging evidence on the impact of timed testing and the ways in which it transforms children’s brains, leading to an inevitable path of math anxiety and low math achievement. (Boaler, Jo)

Her name was Mrs. Hughes.  I can still hear her:

F … F … J … J … F … F … J … J.

Time, accuracy, speed, and precision were ultimately important in the typing class I took my sophomore year of high school.  I am glad that I touch-type.  At typingtest.com, you can assess your typing speed and accuracy.  Here are my latest results:

Screen Shot 2014-12-06 at 11.31.17 AM

And, later in the day…

Screen Shot 2014-12-06 at 6.02.14 PM

There are plenty of people that do not touch type, some hunt-and-peck.  Is their work some how diminished because they may need more time than a touch typist?  If not witnessing the time and effort, would the reader of the product even know whether the author was speedy or not?

Are accuracy and precision when typing more important than speed and time?  Wouldn’t it be better to take more time and have an accurate product than to be quick with errors?

This has me thinking about assessment, testing, and time.  In a perfect world, we want both speed and accuracy.  What if we can’t have both?  What if a learner needs more time to demonstrate what they know?  Do we really expect all children to perform and produce at the same speed?  Are we sacrificing accuracy and precision for the sake of time?  Should it be the other way around? Are we assessing what our learners know and can show or how fast they can think and work?

How important is it to complete an assessment
within a fixed, pre-determined period of time?

How might we offer learners more time to demonstrate what they know and have learned?

Time is the variable; learning is the constant.


Time, accuracy, speed, & precision was first posted on April 30, 2012

Boaler, Jo. “Timed Tests and the Development of Math Anxiety.” Web log post. Jo Boaler. N.p., 06 July 2012. Web. 09 Nov. 2014.