Category Archives: Professional Development Plans

Lesson and Assessment Design – #T3Learns

What are we intentional about in our planning, process, and implementation?

  • Are the learning targets clear and explicit?
  • What are important check points and questions to guide the community to know if learning is occurring?
  • Is there a plan for actions needed when we learn we must pivot?

On Saturday, a small cadre of T3 Instructors gathered to learn together, to explore learning progressions, and to dive deeper in understanding of the Standards for Mathematical Practice.

The pitch:

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Jennifer and I fleshed out the essential learning in more detail:

  • I can design lessons anchored in CCSS or NGSS.
    • I can design a lesson incorporating national standards, an interactive TI-Nspire document, a learning progression, and a formative assessment plan.
    • I can anticipate Standards for Mathematical Practice that learners will employ during this lesson.
  • I can design a learning progression for a skill, competency, or process.
    • I can use student-friendly language when writing “I can…” statements.
    • I can design a leveled assessment for students based on a learning progression.
  • I can collaborate with colleagues to design and refine lessons and assessments.
    • I can calibrate learning progressions with CCSS and/or NGSS.
    • I can calibrate learning progressions with colleagues by giving and receiving growth mindset oriented feedback, i.e. I can offer actionable feedback to colleagues using I like… I wonder… what if…
    • I can refine my learning progressions and assessments using feedback from colleagues.

The first morning session offered our friends and colleagues an opportunity to experience a low-floor-high-ceiling task from Jo Boaler combined with a SMP learning progression.  After the break, we transitioned to explore the Standards for Mathematical Practice in community. The afternoon session’s challenge was to redesign a lesson to incorporate the design components experienced in the morning session.

Don’t miss the tweets from this session.

Here are snippets of the feedback:

I came expecting…

  • To learn about good pedagogy and experience in real time examples of the same. To improve my own skills with lesson design and good pedagogy.
  • Actually, I came expecting a great workshop. I was not disappointed. I came expecting that there would be more focus using the TI-Nspire technology (directly). However, the structure and design was like none other…challenging at first…but then stimulating!
  • to learn how to be more deliberate in creating lessons. Both for the students I mentor and for T3 workshops.
  • I came expecting to deepen my knowledge of lesson design and assessment and to be challenged to incorporate more of this type of teaching into my classes.

I have gotten…

  • so much more than I anticipated. I learned how to begin writing clear “I can” statements. I also have been enriched by those around me. Picking the brains of others has always been a win!
  • More than I bargained. The PD was more of an institute. It seemed to have break-out sessions where I could learn through collaboration, participation, and then challenging direct instruction, … and more!
  • a clear mind map of the process involved in designing lessons. A clarification of what learning progressions are. Modeling skills for when I present trainings. Strengthening my understanding of the 8 math practices.
  • a better idea of a learning progression within a single goal. I think I had not really thought about progressions within a single lesson before. Thanks for opening my eyes to applying it to individual lesson goals.

I still need (or want)…

  • To keep practicing to gain a higher level of expertise and comfort with good lesson design. Seeing how seamlessly these high quality practices can be integrated into lessons inspires me to delve into the resources provided and learn more about them. I appreciate the opportunity to stay connected as I continue to learn.
  • days like this where I can collaborate and get feedback on activities that will improve my teaching and delivery of professional development
  • I want to get better at writing the “I can” statements that are specific to a lesson.
  • I want to keep learning about the use of the five practices and formative assessment.

We want to see more collaborative productive struggle, pathways for success, opportunities for self- and formative assessment, productive conversation to learn, and more.

As Jennifer always says … and so the journey continues…

[Cross-posted at Easing the Hurry Syndrome]

 

Deep Dive into Standards of Mathematical Practice

As a team, we commit to make learning pathways visible. We are working on both horizontal and vertical alignment.  We seek to calibrate our practices with national standards.

On Friday afternoon, we met to take a deep dive into the Standards of Mathematical Practice. Jennifer Wilson joined us to coach, facilitate, and learn. We are grateful for her collaboration, inspiration, and guidance.

The pitch:

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The plan:

Goals:

  • I can anticipate Standards for Mathematical Practice that learners will employ during this lesson.
  • I can begin to design lessons incorporating national standards, a learning progression, and a formative assessment plan.

Norms:

  • Safe space
    • I can talk about what I know, and I can talk about what I don’t know.
    • I can be brave, vulnerable, kind, and considerate to myself and others while learning.
  • Celebrate opportunities to learn
    • I can learn from mistakes, and I can celebrate what I thought before and now know.

Resources:

Learning Plan:

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The learning progressions:

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The slide deck:

As a community of learners, we

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#ILoveMySchool

Math, Mindset, and Learning Progressions – #LL2LU w/@katonims129

One of the hallmarks of learning at Trinity School is Faculty/Staff Forum, our peer-to-peer professional development. Today, Kato Nims and I facilitated as session on math, mindset, and learning progressions.

The pitch:

Title: Math, Mindset, & Learning Progressions

Facilitators: Kato Nims and Jill Gough

Description: Does a learning progression empower and embolden the learn to locate where they are and ask target questions to make progress: Come collaborate with others to tackle a task or two using a learning progression as a self- and formative assessment tool to experience a student’s point of view.

Prerequisites: None. Bring a pencil or colored pen, your growth mindset, and a partner.

The plan:

Our norms:

    • Safe space
      • I can talk about what I know, and I can talk about what I don’t know.
      • I can be brave, vulnerable, kind, and considerate to myself and others while learning.
    • Celebrate opportunities to learn
      • I can learn from mistakes, and I can celebrate what I thought before and now know.

The slide-deck:

Sample feedback and reflections:

This activity helped me see solutions from multiple lenses. Even though the learning progressions were math-based, I can see the potential for using them in science…with some tweaking. When I present STEM challenges to my students I encourage them to use trial and error and to redesign and improve their work. I need to make learning progressions for the next challenge I present!

Connect – I know children need the language to more clearly express their needs in math. They also need to know what they can do instead of saying “I can’t” because they can do something!  Extend – I came away with a better idea of how to quickly assess my students’ levels at the end of a lesson and that allowing time to work with a partner or in a group is very important to extending my students’ learning.  Challenge – to continue to do the work of getting our learning progressions written and finding the time to collaborate as a team.

Connect: Kids need to know what their goals are, as do their teachers. Kids should be able to solve problems in multiple ways. Extend: Kids can have more than one learning progression that they’re working on at once.
Challenge: Allowing the class to explain what progression they are on with me jumping in to help them. :-) Becoming comfortable adding these into the classroom daily. It’s been hard for me going from saying state standards for 10 years going to this, but I think this is actually more beneficial!

While I don’t teach math on a daily basis, I found this session beneficial because I had an opportunity to practice using learning progressions.

It was very valuable to actually experience a student’s perspective while going through a learning progression.

#ILoveMySchool

MyLearningEdu 1.5 (week 5) – Learning Together

How might we learn, reflect, and share?  What if we take a moment of learning and share it with others?

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  1. Read one (or more) of the following blog posts:
  2. Add a Share button to you blog posts to make it easy for others to share your blog posts.
  3. Reflect, write, and post. Read and comment on posts from at least two others in ourMyLearning 1.5 cadre.  You might consider using the following protocol for your comments:
    • I like…
    • I wish…
    • I wonder…
    • I want to know more about…


 

MyLearningEdu 1.5 (week 4) – Learning Together

How might we learn, reflect, and share?  What if we take a moment of learning and share it with others?

  1. Screen Shot 2014-09-01 at 8.36.43 PMRead Reflecting on My Learning 1.0.
  2. Watch The Future of Publishing (shown below).  How might we reframe or reverse the way we are seeing, learning, thinking, and acting?
  3. Reflect, write, and post. Read and comment on posts from at least two others inourMyLearning 1.5 cadre.  You might consider using the following protocol for your comments:
    • I like…
    • I wish…
    • I wonder…
    • I want to know more about…

BONUS: If you have written and published for other websites or magazines, cross post your work on your blog as artifacts of your writing and contributions to the learning of others.  (Examples:  Falconry: I believe in you is posted on Experiments in Learning by Doing and on Flourish.


 

7:20 TED talk and doodle session #TrinityLearns #showyourwork

doodle3

(sketch by @katonims129)

How might we experiment and learn together about creativity, communication, critical reasoning, and collaboration? What if we risk, practice, and share to make our thinking visible? How will we grow and learn if we practice and accept feedback?

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As you can see from the email above, Kato Nims and I have been experimenting with sketch noting or doodling to take visual notes since the beginning of the school year.

Twenty-four of our colleagues responded that they would like to participate on Thursday with several more asking for another session next week because of carpool duty.  The little experiment turned into a bigger experiment.

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Screen Shot 2014-09-18 at 9.00.37 PMEighteen of us gathered in the Art room at 7:20 this morning and another six met this afternoon. We watched Kiran bir Sethi teaches kids to take charge and sketched.

We shared our sketches and ideas in small groups and debriefed the experience.  We will try again next week. I wonder who might take action on this experiment in other venues to learn with others.

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Resources shared in our session:

doodle

MyLearningEdu 1.5 (week 3) – Learning Together

How might we learn, reflect, and share?  What if we take a moment of learning and share it with others?

Screen Shot 2014-09-01 at 8.36.43 PM

  1. Read Categories vs Tags and Silvia Tolisano’s (@langwitchesAnatomy, Grammar, Syntax & Taxonomy of a Hyperlink. Return to your previous post(s) and add both categories and tags and improve any hyperlinks  if you have not already done so.
  2. Watch Matt Cutts: Try something new for 30 days (shown below). What habits should we practice? What habits are we modeling and teaching? What habits do our student-learners want to acquire? How can we make reflection part of the habit of schooling?
  3. Reflect, write, and post. Read and comment on posts from at least two others in ourMyLearning 1.5 cadre.  You might consider using the following protocol for your comments:
    1. I like…
    2. I wish…
    3. I wonder…
    4. I want to know more about…

 


 This course is designed to build teacher experience, confidence, and understanding of reflection, digital portfolios, and feedback.  Strategies employed in this course will be hands-on and digital development practices for reflection, self-assessment, learning, feedback, and growth.

At the end of this course, participants should be able to say:

  • I can use reflection as a formative assessment and self-assessment tool.
    • I can develop and utilize journaling and e-portfolios.
    • I can use authentic peer-to-peer and self-assessment practices to inform professional growth and learning.
  • I can design processes that can be used in a classroom to promote and celebrate self-reflection for learning.
    • I can integrate technologies that enhance self-reflection and asynchronous communication.
    • I can facilitate authentic peer-to-peer and self-assessment practices to motivate growth and learning.
This class will meet asynchronously throughout the semester from August 1 through January 1.  Participants will document their learning on their professional blog.  Participants will collaborate, learn, and share by commenting on the blogs of others participating in this course.

To earn 2 PLU credits (Georgia Department of Education), participants will

  • establish a professional portfolio to document the journey of becoming a more reflective teacher.
  • demonstrate fulfillment of required activities by posting completed work and reflections to individual blogs.
  • model connectedness by reading and commenting on the reflections of others in this course.
  • practice offering warm and cool feedback in constructive, kind, and purposeful ways using suggested protocols.