Category Archives: Social Media

MyLearningEdu 1.5 (week 4) – Learning Together

How might we learn, reflect, and share?  What if we take a moment of learning and share it with others?

  1. Screen Shot 2014-09-01 at 8.36.43 PMRead Reflecting on My Learning 1.0.
  2. Watch The Future of Publishing (shown below).  How might we reframe or reverse the way we are seeing, learning, thinking, and acting?
  3. Reflect, write, and post. Read and comment on posts from at least two others inourMyLearning 1.5 cadre.  You might consider using the following protocol for your comments:
    • I like…
    • I wish…
    • I wonder…
    • I want to know more about…

BONUS: If you have written and published for other websites or magazines, cross post your work on your blog as artifacts of your writing and contributions to the learning of others.  (Examples:  Falconry: I believe in you is posted on Experiments in Learning by Doing and on Flourish.


 

MyLearningEdu 1.5 (week 3) – Learning Together

How might we learn, reflect, and share?  What if we take a moment of learning and share it with others?

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  1. Read Categories vs Tags and Silvia Tolisano’s (@langwitchesAnatomy, Grammar, Syntax & Taxonomy of a Hyperlink. Return to your previous post(s) and add both categories and tags and improve any hyperlinks  if you have not already done so.
  2. Watch Matt Cutts: Try something new for 30 days (shown below). What habits should we practice? What habits are we modeling and teaching? What habits do our student-learners want to acquire? How can we make reflection part of the habit of schooling?
  3. Reflect, write, and post. Read and comment on posts from at least two others in ourMyLearning 1.5 cadre.  You might consider using the following protocol for your comments:
    1. I like…
    2. I wish…
    3. I wonder…
    4. I want to know more about…

 


 This course is designed to build teacher experience, confidence, and understanding of reflection, digital portfolios, and feedback.  Strategies employed in this course will be hands-on and digital development practices for reflection, self-assessment, learning, feedback, and growth.

At the end of this course, participants should be able to say:

  • I can use reflection as a formative assessment and self-assessment tool.
    • I can develop and utilize journaling and e-portfolios.
    • I can use authentic peer-to-peer and self-assessment practices to inform professional growth and learning.
  • I can design processes that can be used in a classroom to promote and celebrate self-reflection for learning.
    • I can integrate technologies that enhance self-reflection and asynchronous communication.
    • I can facilitate authentic peer-to-peer and self-assessment practices to motivate growth and learning.
This class will meet asynchronously throughout the semester from August 1 through January 1.  Participants will document their learning on their professional blog.  Participants will collaborate, learn, and share by commenting on the blogs of others participating in this course.

To earn 2 PLU credits (Georgia Department of Education), participants will

  • establish a professional portfolio to document the journey of becoming a more reflective teacher.
  • demonstrate fulfillment of required activities by posting completed work and reflections to individual blogs.
  • model connectedness by reading and commenting on the reflections of others in this course.
  • practice offering warm and cool feedback in constructive, kind, and purposeful ways using suggested protocols.

MyLearningEdu 1.5 (week 2) – Learning Together

How might we learn, reflect, and share?  What if we take a moment of learning and share it with others?

  1. Screen Shot 2014-09-01 at 8.36.43 PMRead What Do You Know About Creative Commons by Bill Ferriter and/or How to Attribute Creative Commons images in your blog properly?
  2. Peak Learning Exercise – “Think about your own life and the times when you were really learning, so much and so deeply, that you would call these the “peak learning experiences” of your life. Write a rough draft: Tell a story (you may include pictures, symbols, or other icons, too) about this peak learning experience, and respond to the question, “What were the conditions that made your high-level experience so powerful and engaging?”(adapted from 21st Century Skills: Learning for Life in Our Times, Trilling and Fadel, 2009; used as choice in Writing-Is-Thinking CFT Pre-Institute Assignment with Bo Adams in 2012.)
  3. Post one of your Peak Learning Experiences on your blog.


 At the end of this course, participants should be able to say:

  • I can use reflection as a formative assessment and self-assessment tool.
    • I can develop and utilize journaling and e-portfolios.
    • I can use authentic peer-to-peer and self-assessment practices to inform professional growth and learning.
  • I can design processes that can be used in a classroom to promote and celebrate self-reflection for learning.
    • I can integrate technologies that enhance self-reflection and asynchronous communication.
    • I can facilitate authentic peer-to-peer and self-assessment practices to motivate growth and learning.

 

MyLearningEdu 1.5 (week 1) – Learning Together

How might we learn, reflect, and share?  What if we take a moment of learning and share it with others?

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  1. Read Becoming a Reflective Teacher.
  2. Watch Obvious to You, Amazing to Others from Derek Sivers.
  3. Select a blog platform, get setup, and write an introductory post about your learning.


 This course is designed to build teacher experience, confidence, and understanding of reflection, digital portfolios, and feedback.  Strategies employed in this course will be hands-on and digital development practices for reflection, self-assessment, learning, feedback, and growth.

At the end of this course, participants should be able to say:

  • I can use reflection as a formative assessment and self-assessment tool.
    • I can develop and utilize journaling and e-portfolios.
    • I can use authentic peer-to-peer and self-assessment practices to inform professional growth and learning.
  • I can design processes that can be used in a classroom to promote and celebrate self-reflection for learning.
    • I can integrate technologies that enhance self-reflection and asynchronous communication.
    • I can facilitate authentic peer-to-peer and self-assessment practices to motivate growth and learning.
This class will meet asynchronously throughout the semester from August 1 through January 1.  Participants will document their learning on their professional blog.  Participants will collaborate, learn, and share by commenting on the blogs of others participating in this course.

To earn 2 PLU credits (Georgia Department of Education), participants will

  • establish a professional portfolio to document the journey of becoming a more reflective teacher.
  • demonstrate fulfillment of required activities by posting completed work and reflections to individual blogs.
  • model connectedness by reading and commenting on the reflections of others in this course.
  • practice offering warm and cool feedback in constructive, kind, and purposeful ways using suggested protocols.

#BrightSpot Ethnography and #Buoyancy using Twitter – Learning Together

To pursue bright spots is to ask the question “What’s working, and how can we do more of it?” Sounds simple, doesn’t it? Yet, in the real world, this obvious question is almost never asked. (p. 45, Heath and Heath)

…“buoyancy”— a quality that combines grittiness of spirit and sunniness of outlook. (Pink, 4 pag.)

What if we broadcast bright spots of learning? What if we intentionally observe our community and culture through a lens that some might call rose-colored? How might we collaboratively and creatively tell the story of what is most important? What if we document and share small moments?

As we have seen, even the smallest moments of positivity in the workplace can enhance efficiency, motivation, creativity, and productivity. (Achor, 58 pag.)

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At the end of this 1-PLU course, each learner should be able to say:

  • I can contribute to the bright spot ethnographic data collection of our learning community using Twitter.
  • I can use the power of positivity to elevate the learner and learning in and out of school.
  • I can bright spot learning in our school and inform the larger community of the myriad of learning experiences that happen daily.
  • I can foster and develop connections with other educators and experts to expand my Professional Learning Network (PLN).

How might we learn more about our community and each other? What if we continue to develop a culture and a habit of positivity, bright spots, and buoyancy?


Achor, Shawn (2010-09-14). The Happiness Advantage: The Seven Principles of Positive Psychology That Fuel Success and Performance at Work Crown Publishing Group. Kindle Edition.

Heath, Chip, and Dan Heath. Switch: How to Change Things When Change Is Hard. Waterville, Me.: Thorndike, 2011. Print.

Pink, Daniel H. (2012-12-31). To Sell Is Human: The Surprising Truth About Moving Others (p. 4). Penguin Group US. Kindle Edition.

#LL2LU Fractions – we are smarter than me & modeling C’s – #MPVschool & #TrinityLearns

A new definition of strength: Can we learn together? What if we collaborate, ask for feedback, and lean in to leverage expertise and perspective of others?

If we truly believe in communication, collaboration, and the other C’s, how are we – as lead learners – modeling and taking action?

<Note the timestamps in the following communication, collaboration, critical thinking, and problem-solving.>

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“Hear” snippets of Nicole’s thoughts as she is developing the assessment shown above:

    •  I’m  writing a mathematics unit for a grade level that I have never taught to learn, to  help my team, to help our young learners.
    • This is hard.
    • I’m trying to model backwards design unit planning (Grant Wiggins hung the moon, most recently evidenced by his math blog post today). Stage 2 (How will I know when they have learned it?) must come before Stage 3 (the learning plan). Teachers should have access to the assessments (formative and summative) at the beginning of the unit.
    • Our learning outcomes are all I have to work with.  Reading these standards in depth helps me some, but I need feedback.
    • I heart Google.
    • The “I can…” statements need to be student-friendly. They will be directly related to the standards-based rubric we will need to create.
    • I’ve worked through several leveled assessments as collaborations with classroom teachers, but I have yet to write one independently.
    • Wait, why am I writing this independently? It’s nearly midnight. I’m sending this to Jill.

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“Hear” snippets of Jill’s thoughts as she gave feedback and edited the assessment shown above:

      • Wow…Such good work.
      • Level 1 “I can decompose a figure into equal parts. I can name each part.”  
        • I wonder if decompose is a 3rd grade word. (I do not know.)  I also wonder about “partition” as a 3rd grade word.
        • I wonder if you are having a resolution problem with the shapes in Level 1. The image shown is a rectangle, not a square.
        • I wonder how successful a child can be partitioning the circle without having the center marked and using a compass.
      • Level 2 “I can represent a fraction on the number line when some fractions are given to me.“  
        • Can we eliminate the word “some” and/or simplify?
        • What if we say I can represent fractions on a number line?
        • What if we add number lines to identify fractions before asking students to take action on number lines? Just this month, Jennifer Wilson and I presented on conceptual understanding of fractions and the new way to convey a consistent story using number lines. 
        • My TI-Nspire software and the fraction lessons will give me number lines. I’m not sure about mixed numbers and partitions past 1, but Nicole will know.  At least adding a visual might help.

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Nicole thinking:

How on earth did Jill create this fancy number line in a Google doc? I like her train of thought here but think the visual at it stands now will be too hard for grade 3 students.

Jill’s thinking:

Right. Number lines too hard. Would it be easier if we think together now that we are both awake?

Below is a copy of the next iteration of this assessment after a Google hangout discussion and co-learning conversation.

How might we collaborate, ask for feedback, and lean in to leverage expertise and perspective of others?

A new definition of strength: We are stronger than me. Learn and share!


[Cross posted on Curriculum Reflections] 

Developing a Virtual Learning Community – #T3Learns session

How might we stay connected, offer additional ideas, and share experiences with others? What if we leverage social media tools? How might we continue to lead learning without stretching ourselves too thin? How might we continue to contribute to our learning community when we are apart? How might we be more intentional in PD sessions to foster continued learning? What if we explore effective use of tools to develop and maintain connectedness and build learning communities? Will we learn and share?

Jeff McCalla, @jmccalla1 and Confessions of a Wannabe Super Teacher, and I facilitated a session for T3 instructors on building and maintaining learning communites to learn, share, and support learning.  Our lesson design, strategies, and resources are shared on the Developing a Virtual Learning Community Google doc.  We were charged with the responsibility to lead a session for T³ instructors to  brainstorm and share useful strategies to connect and learn from and with others. At the end of this session, our community should be able to say:

    • I can contribute to learning communities both face-to-face and virtually.
    • I can use social media to connect with fellow T3 instructors before , during, and after PD.
    • I can use social media to connect with participants before, during, and after our PD.

We ran 4 sessions today – all very different.  Jeff is a master of the art of questioning. He guided the discussion and connected to the learning plan while accommodating the learners in the room.  At each session we answered questions concerning the how and why of Twitter and blogging. His blog post What Super-power do you want? offered a grounding story for our discussion.  (Read comments by Bo and Jill to learn more.)

Here are snippets of our conversations, learning, and questions.

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