Tag Archives: #MyLearningEDU

Goals and Self-Assessment – Reflecting on My Learning as of February 9, 2014

I submitted a goal on April 8 which I updated on September 3October 3, and November 10, 2013.   Have I made progress on my goal through the action steps?  What will I learn if I review my intentions and collect evidence that supports my goal? If I take the time to check in and self-assess, will I be able to determine if I’m on a good path?

My Goal:

To purposefully act to forward Trinity School’s mission, faculty-learners and student-learners will grow significantly in their use of reflection and the formative, diagnostic, and self-assessment knowledge that come from such an approach to learning.

Action Steps:

  • Intentionally reflect and question to grow and learn. Publicly publish my reflections at Experiments in Learning by Doing. Connect with others by broadcasting each post via Twitter.
  • Reflect on learning by keeping a running record in an e-portfolio. Encourage and provide opportunities and support for others to develop professional portfolios that document learning, growth and reflections.
  • Support reflection, questioning, and growth of learners by designing and engaging in professional development opportunities for teacher-learners to learn by doing. Examples:
    • MyLearningEDU 1.5  for teacher-learners to model and experience My Learning from the student perspective.
    • Twitter for Learning  for teacher-learners to foster and develop connections with other educators and experts.
    • Leading Learners to Level Up  for teacher-learner teams to design and implement formative assessment that diagnoses and differentiates while leading learning.
    • (Added in November) Observation of Practice takes on the task of seeking and gaining perspective.  How might we help teachers focus on what is happening in classrooms in a systematic, purposeful and focused way? How might we model and embrace formative assessment of our practice? How might we leverage peer-to-peer assessment and feedback?

Shelley Paul (@lottascales) and I have facilitated two more rounds of Leading Learners to Level Up (#LL2LU) for The English Connection at Woodward and for Kindergarten-9th grade math teachers at Trinity, Walker, Woodward, Westminster, and Mount Vernon.  We also hosted a conversation at EduCon on writing learning progressions.  Our EduCon session was in collaboration with the Martin Institute and was broadcast to seven cities in the US with a total of approximately 140 participants.

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Broadcasting to multiple sites was a great learning experience.  Our site facilitators offered feedback on several areas.

Jill’s session was excellent. I’ve had great feedback from Renbrook teachers, especially US teachers from 3 different departments-English, World Language, and Science, who said they can see immediate application of the concept. They felt the presentation was a good blend of instruction and opportunity for collaborative practice. They plan on sharing this concept at department meetings this week. The Lower School teachers who attended will present the concept at a meeting in the near future.

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Although we got behind schedule given the tech issues, the most informative moment was when our group was working on the creation of examples of LL2LU.  Although we thought the task would be simple as we set out to do our work, it actually was more difficult than we imagined.  Hence, the “I like,”  “I wonder,” and “What if” was very effective.  We weren’t able to post many examples given we were behind schedule, but viewing the myriad of postings on Flickr was equally exciting.  The group continually shared various findings as they were clicking around the sites.  Additionally, we collectively appreciated the “I can” and scaffolded approach to reaching a learning goal.  Much to think about here ….

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Overall we got good feedback from this session.  We lost the feed a few times and it was hard to know exactly what was happening at times, but all of the preplanning that Jill and Shelley had done paid off – the lesson plan, agenda, etc helped keep us on track and we were able to continue the conversation even when we lost the feed.

There is a new team at Trinity piloting Observation of Practice this month, and I’ve shared the learning plan with interested teams at Westminster and Woodward.

Twitter for Learning had a plus this month too.  Karen Boykins (@K_Boykins) has requested the next course in the Twitter for Learning series.  Karen and Samantha Steinberg (@spsteinberg) collaborated with me to develop a list of essential outcomes for the second course in this series. How exciting to have learners ask for new learning experiences and challenges!

I like what I’ve done so far.  I continue to see products of my action steps in our Faculty’s #TrinityLearns tweets and with #LL2LU participants. I love this tweet from Kato – a nice mashup of assessment, feedback, and assessment.

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I wish I could interest and inspire more faculty to participate in MyLearningEDU 1.5. I wonder if I should design MyLearningEDU1.0 as a simpler first step.

My to-do list now includes developing and securing PLU credit for Connections and Furthering PLNs in the Twitter for Learning series and developing MyLearningEDU1.0.

Have I made small course corrections when needed?  What additional action steps need to be added?

_________________________

To see the development of this goal, see iterations

Goals and Self-Assessment – Reflecting on My Learning as of November 10, 2013

I submitted a goal on April 8 which I updated on September 3, 2013 and reviewed on October 3, 2013. Another month has gone by. Have I made progress on my goal through the action steps?  If I take the time to check in and self-assess, will I be able to determine if I’m on a good path? Will I be able to make a small course correction if I’ve gotten distracted along the way because of the busyness of school? What if I review my intentions and collect evidence now that supports my goal? What if I hold myself accountable for making small progress in just one month?

My Goal:

To purposefully act to forward Trinity School’s mission, faculty-learners and student-learners will grow significantly in their use of reflection and the formative, diagnostic, and self-assessment knowledge that come from such an approach to learning.

Action Steps:

  • Intentionally reflect and question to grow and learn. Publicly publish my reflections at Experiments in Learning by Doing using the tag #MyLearningEdu. Connect with others by broadcasting each post via Twitter.
  • Reflect on learning by keeping a running record in an e-portfolio. Encourage and provide opportunities and support for others to develop professional portfolios that document learning, growth and reflections.
  • Support reflection, questioning, and growth of learners by designing and engaging in professional development opportunities for teacher-learners to learn by doing. Examples:
    • MyLearningEDU 1.5  for teacher-learners to model and experience My Learning from the student perspective.
    • Twitter for Learning  for teacher-learners to foster and develop connections with other educators and experts.
    • Leading Learners to Level Up  for teacher-learner teams to design and implement formative assessment that diagnoses and differentiates while leading learning.

I continue to blog at least once a week. I’ve decided not to use #MyLearningEdu as a category or tag.  It doesn’t seem to make sense to me right now to use this tag.  I still owe Maggie Berthiaume a couple of comments and tweets.

Shelley Paul (@lottascales) and I have facilitated a complete 1-PLU course round of Leading Learners to Level Up (#LL2LU) for The English Connection at Woodward and for math teachers at Trinity and Mount Vernon.  We are planning another round of each during the winter.  I offered a Leading Learners to Level Up session on learning progressions at Trinity’s October 30 Faculty/Staff Forum.

I like what I’ve done so far.  I’ve seen products of my action steps in our Faculty’s #TrinityLearns tweets, Kathy and Maggie’s reflections on their blogs, and with the #LL2LU participants.

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See PD in Action for more stories of application of learning progressions and formative assessment.

I’ve also written a new 1-PLU course, Observation of Practice, for our teachers based on the comments of Arleen and Laura after reading my reflection of the class we taught together.  They both commented on how helpful it was to see their class from another perspective. Observation of Practice will integrate formative assessment and reflection with peer observation by having each team member reflect.

    • As a result of this observation of practice and feedback loop, which aspects of my teaching do I feel are bright spots?
    • As a result of this observation of practice and feedback loop, what questions do I have about my own teaching?
    • As a result of this observation of practice and feedback loop, what new ideas do I have?

I have to say that I find it helpful and motivating to check on my progress each month.  Am I intentionally working on my goal? Am I making progress? Have I made small course corrections to get back on track when I find myself distracted by other important work?

I’d love your feedback on any part of this process. Your questions and comments will help me learn and grow.

_________________________

To see the development of this goal, see iterations

Goals and Self-Assessment – Reflecting on My Learning as of October 3, 2013

I submitted a goal on April 8 which I updated on September 3, 2013. Another month has gone by. Have I made progress on my goal through the action steps?  If I take the time to check in and self-assess, will I be able to determine if I’m on a good path? Will I be able to make a small course correction if I’ve gotten distracted along the way because of the busyness of school? What if I review my intentions and collect evidence now that supports my goal? What if I hold myself accountable for making small progress in just one month?

My Goal:

To purposefully act to forward Trinity School’s mission, faculty-learners and student-learners will grow significantly in their use of reflection and the formative, diagnostic, and self-assessment knowledge that come from such an approach to learning.

Action Steps:

  • Intentionally reflect and question to grow and learn. Publicly publish my reflections at Experiments in Learning by Doing using the tag #MyLearningEdu. Connect with others by broadcasting each post via Twitter.
  • Reflect on learning by keeping a running record in an e-portfolio. Encourage and provide opportunities and support for others to develop professional portfolios that document learning, growth and reflections.
  • Support reflection, questioning, and growth of learners by designing and engaging in professional development opportunities for teacher-learners to learn by doing. Examples:
    • MyLearningEDU 1.5  for teacher-learners to model and experience My Learning from the student perspective.
    • Twitter for Learning  for teacher-learners to foster and develop connections with other educators and experts.
    • Leading Learners to Level Up  for teacher-learner teams to design and implement formative assessment that diagnoses and differentiates while leading learning.

Well, I have been blogging at least once a week, but I have not been using #MyLearningEdu as a category or tag.  I wonder if I want to go back and tag my blog posts or revise my action step.  It doesn’t seem to make sense to me right now to use this tag.  Hmm…

There are two teacher-learners working through the MyLearningEDU 1.5 course. I might need to step up my game on commenting on their posts.  I have commented on and tweeted out Kathy Bruyn’s posts, but I owe Maggie Berthiaume a couple of comments and tweets.  Their blogs are awesome if you have not looked at them. These blogs are very different, and I learn from both.

There are 20 teacher-learners officially participating in Twitter for Learning with many more participating unofficially.  Evidence of their reflection and learning can be found at #TrinityLearns, #WALearns, #WalkerLearns, and #CDSLearns.  Mark Silberberg (@SilberbergMark) and his team are also participating using #LREILearns.

Shelley Paul (@lottascales) and I have facilitated Leading Learners to Level Up (#LL2LU) for The English Connection at Woodward and for math teachers at Trinity and Mount Vernon.  Kate Burton and I have tinkered with #LL2LU for risk-taking and persistence and tenacity. I am using #LL2LU as a tag for these posts.

I like what I’ve done so far.  I wonder if I’ve done enough to encourage and motivate  others to develop professional portfolios that document learning, growth and reflections. I wish I could make this seem easier. What if I become more intentional about modeling the #LL2LU method of formative assessment by applying the leveled self-assessment rubric for Twitter for Learning?

I’d love your feedback on any part of this process. Your questions and comments will help me learn and grow.

_________________________

To see the development of this goal, see iterations Goals and Self-Assessment – Updated September 2013Goals and Self-Assessment April, 2013 and Developing a goal, a SMART Goal – learner outcomes and action steps.

#TrinityLearns integrated studies (week 3)

When we have the opportunity to see what happens in other parts of our community, we begin to connect ideas and experiences.

Alpin Hong and Jun-Ching Lin surprised our 6th graders with visit and a brilliant lesson on harmony, color theory, and superhero theme music.

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It was Fitness Friday in First Grade. How great is it to combine math and fitness? Don’t you just love that two of our PE team lifted the work and learning of both the student-learners and the teacher-learners in 1st Grade?

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If you read #TrinityLearns Community (week 2), you know that we are teaching each other new ways to communicate learning.  Last week many of us learned about the app Pic Stitch which quickly combines multiple images into a collage.  (I asked Amanda Thomas, and Joe asked Jedd Austin.)  Notice how Kathy bright spots Brian’s work with our 2nd Graders.

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This week, Melissa Walker embedded her class’s twitter feed on her Haiku page.  This seems to be spreading through the 5th and 6th grade Haiku pages so that our families have another view of what happens at school. Amanda bright spots Melissa’s work.

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We’ve also seen our young learners making connections between math and science.

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Perhaps two of my favorite tweets – because they helped me connect in person – were from our 3s and Pre-K classrooms.  I could sit down with these young learners at carpool and ask them good questions.  They could describe details about their day, their interests, and their learning. I now know we need a rocket ship to rescue the balloons that got away.  I learn more and more each day about the interests of our learners.

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What will we learn about, for, and with each other as we continue to learn and share?

There were many more beautiful, rich learning experiences for all learners in our community.  A digest of our Tweets from the 3rd week of school is shown below.

#TrinityLearns Community (week 2)

What did you do at school today? Or, better yet, what happened at school today?

There are many days that I know what I did, but I wonder what else happened.  What if we leveraged technology to learn and share, to have a broader and deeper view into the learning episodes in our community?

There are many more voices contributing to the #TrinityLearns stream of information about the learning and celebrations happening daily.  At the end of this post, I’ve archived some of the tweets of the week, but I want to reflect on several that caught my attention.

I know that our 5th graders take the responsibility to raise the flag each morning, but I don’t see it happen.  Can you imagine a better way to learn about Social Studies and our country?Screen Shot 2013-09-02 at 6.40.12 PM

We know that our young learners are incredibly curious about technology and learning, but what does that look like?

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How did we celebrate the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech?

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How do we learn and share? How are we connected? How do we tell  stories of learning? How do we see the entire journey of a child when we experience only a short time with them?

I love my school community.

Feedback: Pre-Planning Schedule – community learning

Another question I should have asked in my previous post, Back to school: Pre-Planning Schedule – community learning, is about feedback for learning.  Do we ask our learners (teachers or and students) what they liked, what they wished might be different, and for additional ideas?

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I sent the request for feedback later than I should have sent it.  I didn’t want to send it on Friday, September 16, since it was the first full day of school.  I wish I’d sent it on Monday or Tuesday instead of Friday.

The entire set of feedback is shown below.  As I scanned it, time seemed to be the topic most discussed, along with Happy (1/2) Hour and other meetings.  The balance of task and maintenance seemed to be recognized. I pasted the comments into Wordle.net for visuals. Interesting, don’t you think?

My take-a-way:  We liked how much time we had; we wished for more time; and we wondered if we had too much time.

I wish that there were more voices in the feedback. I appreciated every comment and every face-to-face conversation.  I want to improve in my ability to differentiate. I cannot grow and improve without good feedback.

How do we carry on with our traditions, integrate new and important sessions for faculty, and balance the schedule for our time together before our students arrive? How do we model the feedback that we want to see in our classrooms?  How do we respond to this feedback? How do we continue to put emphasis on building relationships in our community as we learn and work together?

#TrinityLearns Community (week 1)

It was a busy first week of school getting acquainted with each other, making new friends, and learning together.  We believe in having a strong sense of community, balancing tradition with a forward-thinking philosophy, having a child-centered focus, and personalizing learning where process is equally as important as product.  We have dedicated faculty and staff who love, support, and nurture our young learners.

We learn and share together in many ways.  I learned so much about my school today by reviewing this week’s #TrinityLearns tweets.  The sample below offers a glimpse into our first week of school.

I am always struck by the thoughtfulness of children.  “Keep confidence” was a rule offered by a 1st grader for the class constitution. Wow! I am not sure if I ever had a class where I was offered the opportunity to help set the rules or norms of how we would work together.  If you read through the tweets above, it was a common theme this week at Trinity.

The search for the missing Gingerbread Man became a school-wide event.  Think of the chemistry, collaboration, reading, writing, and community understanding that was explored while creating, searching for, and finding him.  It was a true community celebration.

There is so much to know, observe, and learn.  I see a strong balance of technology and no technology.  I see dedicated adults working with engaged children. I see student choice and student voice. I see personalized learning in many different spaces and environments. I see relationship-building activities for our entire community.

I wonder…what do you see?