Category Archives: 21st Century Learning

Patience required: Growth over time #MyLearning

Learning is not an insta-grow experience.

Struggle – working at the edges of ability – is critical.  Patience is required as is a growth mindset.

It might take a while to see evidence of growth. What if we practice, struggle, share, and seek feedback?

I’ve been tinkering with sketch noting, a.k.a. doodling, to make thinking visible, to listen differently, and to retain information.

I started last June, and it was awful.  You can see a body of work on my MyLearning Journey for #ShowYourWork Doodles and Sketch Notes Pinterest board.

Here is  page 2 of my notes from Joe’s opening comments for Trinity Faculty on August 4, 2014.dd23378ccd6e1a1ccb03646990fe5bcd

Is my thinking visible?

Here is page 2 of my notes while learning with George Couros during his Martin Institute keynote on June 9, 2015, just a quick ten months later.
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Can you see my growth? I wonder if my learning is evident to the viewer of these artifacts.

I find value and real joy in having the collection.  My portfolio of doodles shows several concurrent journeys.

How might we teach, model, and facilitate experiences to collect, select, and reflect learning over time?

Growth over time…patience required.

Developing 21st Century Teachers and Schools (Part II: Schools)

Developing 21st Century Teachers and Schools (Part II: Schools)

What does the cutting edge picture of the new school look like? How does technology fit into this picture? For independent schools that want to design new programs or new educational models, what are today’s exemplars?

John Katzman: The future of schools and school design.

Russ Whitehurst: The challenges we face in rethinking the K12 education model and curricula.

Facilitated discussion (Kim Wargo): Do independent schools need to reinvent themselves to become true 21st century schools and if so, how?

From John Katzman:

JohnKatzman

From Russ Whitehurst:

RussWhitehurst


I am honored to be an invited participant as NAIS gathers a group of expert educators, psychologists, and thought leaders at Vanderbilt University’s Peabody College of Education in Nashville, Tennessee, to discuss advances in the science of learning and what it tells us about teaching, curricula, and schools on May 19-20 for its fourth Deep Dive: NAIS Explores the Science of Learning and 21st Century Schools.

 

 

Developing 21st Century Teachers and Schools (Part I: Teacher Education)

Developing 21st Century Teachers and Schools (Part I: Teacher Education)

What does a successful teacher education program (certificate/badge-based and degree-based) look like? What needs to change to make teacher education both accessible and affordable?

Marcy Singer-Gabella, Vanderbilt Faculty: 21st century teacher education.

Facilitated discussion (Vince Durnan): What’s the pathway to a more professionalized independent school teaching force? How do we evaluate teacher success and quality if we don’t have independent school teacher “standards”? How do schools support that end?

From Marcy Singer-Gabella:

How might we see teaching as a team sport? What if we team to learn and to teach where there is need?  How might we  change opportunities for learning if we leverage teacher strength to support learner need? What if we remix and partner to serve all learners?

How do we attract and retain high quality teachers? How do we help our teachers continue to learn and to lead?

MarcySingerGabella

How are we attending to systems of complexity? Marcy Singer-Gabella recommends grappling with the  Cynefin Framework from Dave Snowden.

Another model for mentoring from ‘s Mentoring Program: See How It Works.


I am honored to be an invited participant as NAIS gathers a group of expert educators, psychologists, and thought leaders at Vanderbilt University’s Peabody College of Education in Nashville, Tennessee, to discuss advances in the science of learning and what it tells us about teaching, curricula, and schools on May 19-20 for its fourth Deep Dive: NAIS Explores the Science of Learning and 21st Century Schools.

 

 

Teachers and Teaching (Part II: Teaching)

Teachers and Teaching (Part II: Teaching)

What should we truly be teaching teachers about their profession today? What would this look like?

 Jal Mehta (@jal_mehta): Transforming schools for deeper learning.

Carolyn Strom: Teaching and the role of differentiated instruction.

Facilitated discussion (Tim Fish): What is an independent school “teacher of the future?” How do we ensure that independent school teachers are the best of the best? What can schools do to better support them?

From Jal Mehta (@jal_mehta):

Theory of deep learning: purpose, meaning, play spiral back. Follow coaches to learn to develop skill while playing, before play, and in planning.

What assumptions do we make about higher order reasoning and thinking in our learners lacking in basic skills? Don’t underestimate learners. Bloom’s taxonomy not meant as a ladder; think of it as a web.

JalMehta

From Carolyn Strom:

PD should be targets as should learning. Parallels are strong. If I don’t know how, what is a pathway for success?  How might we learn by experience and by doing? What is we collaborate to learn, grow, and customize learning.

How might we team, as teacher-learners, to learn more about one learning difference, to become an expert on serving children with this need? What if we collaborate, observe each other and our children, and use student work as data? How might our actions and learning change?

CarolynStrom

How do we take action to serve all learners in our care? What learning is needed to help empower teachers personalize learning for every child?


I am honored to be an invited participant as NAIS gathers a group of expert educators, psychologists, and thought leaders at Vanderbilt University’s Peabody College of Education in Nashville, Tennessee, to discuss advances in the science of learning and what it tells us about teaching, curricula, and schools on May 19-20 for its fourth Deep Dive: NAIS Explores the Science of Learning and 21st Century Schools.

 

 

Teachers and Teaching (Part I: Teachers)

Teachers and Teaching (Part I: Teachers)

How can teachers break out of familiar constraints in order to influence school and classroom practice, education policy, and school reform? How do we help teachers make the shift to different teaching methods and paradigms? What’s the impact on teachers, support staff, curriculum, and professional development?

Rick Hess (@rickhess99): Key take-aways from The Cage-Busting Teacher.

Joel Rose (@NCJoelRose): The changing teacher paradigm. Teach to One

 Facilitated discussion (Ruth Fletcher): How is learning and teaching changing in our schools? How are teachers adapting to the changing educational and student landscapes? What are the push-backs and how are they overcome?

From Rick Hess (@rickhess99):

Build opportunities to listen differently, work differently, think differently. Does the playbook change based on talent? When Peyton Manning came onboard, the playbook changed. How do we leverage the talent and experience under our roof?

Environment and culture matters.

Rethink time. Do more of what is working. Close gaps to gain time. Leverage expertise for impact.

What does it look like to rethink? What actions do we take? Teachers are open to things if they feel like they’re part of the design process.

RickHess

From Joel Rose (@NCJoelRose):

How might we teach learners where they are? Teaching something they are not ready for is a waste of time. Teaching something they already know is a waste of time.  Teach what they are ready for, need, and can use now. Open pathways for learning. Make it personal.

Image a different classroom, a different model. Focus on R&D. Currently, lots of research with not a lot of development.  Learn, shift, learn, rethink, remix.

Close gaps to gain time.

Empower teachers to be part of the design process.

JoelRose

Listen to the learner.  Differentiate. Love. Learn with. Co-learning. Co-leading.

How might we holistically rethink what we do, how we learn, the ways we use time?

Lead, learn, partner, collaborate.


I am honored to be an invited participant as NAIS gathers a group of expert educators, psychologists, and thought leaders at Vanderbilt University’s Peabody College of Education in Nashville, Tennessee, to discuss advances in the science of learning and what it tells us about teaching, curricula, and schools on May 19-20 for its fourth Deep Dive: NAIS Explores the Science of Learning and 21st Century Schools.

21st Century Skills and Outcomes

21st Century Skills and Outcomes

If the neuroscience is the how, then what is our vision of the what? What are the skills and other traits we are seeking in our students?

Ken Kay (@kenkay21): 21st century skills and implications for education and learning.

Charles Fadel: Defining education for the 21st century.

Facilitated discussion (Alex Curtis): How are 21st Century Skills and traits being incorporated into learning and teaching practices at our schools? What steps should schools be considering to make this happen? How do we know if we are succeeding?

From Ken Kay (@kenkay21):

How might we blend content, curriculum, processes into the fabric of learning? What if we focus on the C’s (you pick a number of them) as a lens for learning, actions, and growth? What are the actions we take to offer actionable feedback to foster learning and growth?

KenKay

From Charles Fadel:

When revising curriculum to focus on deep learning, use a scalpel not a chainsaw.  We don’t throw out all content. We focus on essentials to go deep to broaden coverage and deepen learning.  Broaden learning experiences that integrate, offer relevance, seek opportunities for personal engagement and experience.

CharlesFadel

Learning is social, collaborative, emotional, personal.

How might we

  • learn and share?
  • offer actionable feedback?
  • focus on what is essential for a learner to learn?
  • deep learning?
  • empower learners?
  • make learning personal?

I am honored to be an invited participant as NAIS gathers a group of expert educators, psychologists, and thought leaders at Vanderbilt University’s Peabody College of Education in Nashville, Tennessee, to discuss advances in the science of learning and what it tells us about teaching, curricula, and schools on May 19-20 for its fourth Deep Dive: NAIS Explores the Science of Learning and 21st Century Schools.

 

 

Neuroscience and the Implications for Learning and Teaching

Neuroscience and the Implications for Learning and Teaching

What does the latest neuro science research tell us about how children learn and what are the implications for schools and teachers? What should teachers and schools do differently and how do we get them to do this?

Mary Helen Immordino-Yang: The most provocative take-aways from learning and neuroscience research.

Joanna Christodoulou (@Joanna22c): The connection between education and cognitive neuroscience as it applies to reading development, difficulties, and intervention.

 Facilitated discussion (Martha Haakmat@marthahaakmat): As a practical matter, how are schools actually using the learning research? How do we encourage schools to integrate this new knowledge?

From Mary Helen Immordino-Yang:

Meaningful learning ALWAYS involves emotion! Learn how to feel and find meaning. Notice and note.  Don’t waste emotion on the irrelevant. Concentrate of the feel in intrinsic power. Emotions are not separate from cognition.

When we thing about learning, we completely miss the fact that knowledge, its usefulness, its application is emotional thought.  It’s in the the overlap between cognitive and affective processing.MaryHelen

From Joanna Christodoulou:

Effective teaching can rewire a brain.  Learners who struggle need alternate learning pathways. It is imperative that we know our learners, meet them where they are, and empower/embolden them to take action to learn.

JoannaChristodoulou


I am honored to be an invited participant as NAIS gathers a group of expert educators, psychologists, and thought leaders at Vanderbilt University’s Peabody College of Education in Nashville, Tennessee, to discuss advances in the science of learning and what it tells us about teaching, curricula, and schools on May 19-20 for its fourth Deep Dive: NAIS Explores the Science of Learning and 21st Century Schools.