Category Archives: Conferences

Read with Me? Book study: 5 Practices for Orchestrating Productive Conversations

What if we study and practice, together, to embed formative assessment into our daily practice and learning?

After the success of the slow-chat book study on Embedding Formative Assessment we plan to engage in another slow chat book study.

A few years ago, as we embraced focusing our classrooms on the Standards for Mathematical Practice, a number of our community began reading and using the book by Peg and Mary Kay Stein, 5 Practices for Orchestrating Productive Mathematics Discussions.

This book has been transformational to many educators, and there is also a companion book focused on the science classroom, 5 Practices for Orchestrating Task-Based Discussions in Science, by Jennifer Cartier and Margaret S. Smith.

Both books are also available in pdf format and NCTM offers them together as a bundle.

Simultaneous Study
: As our community works with both math and science educators, we are going to try something unique in reading the books simultaneously and sharing ideas using the same hashtag.

We know that reading these books, with the emphasis on classroom practices, will be worth our time. In addition to encouraging those who have not read them, we expect that those who have read them previously will find it beneficial to re-read and share with educators around the world.

Slow Chat Book Study
: For those new to this idea of a “slow chat book study”, we will use Twitter to share our thoughts with each other, using the hashtag #T3Learns.

With a slow chat book study you are not required to be online at any set time. Instead, share and respond to others’ thoughts as you can. Great conversations will unfold – just at a slower pace.

When you have more to say than 140 characters, we encourage you to link to blog posts, pictures, or other documents. There is no need to sign up for the study – just use your Twitter account and the hashtag #T3Learns when you post your comments.

Don’t forget to search for others’ comments using the hashtag #T3Learns.

Book Study Schedule
: We have established the following schedule and daily prompts to help with sharing and discussion. This will allow us to wrap up in early June.

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The content of the Math and Science versions line up fairly well, with the exception of the chapters being off by one.

We continue to used the following prompts to spur discussion.

#SlowMath: look for meaning before the procedure

In her #CMCS15 session, Jennifer Wilson (@jwilson828) asks:

How might we leverage technology to build procedural fluency from conceptual understanding?  What if we encourage sketching to show connections?

What if we explore right triangle trigonometry and  equations of circles through the lens of the Slow Math Movement?  Will we learn more deeply, identify patterns, and make connections?

How might we promote and facilitate deep practice?

This is not ordinary practice. This is something else: a highly targeted, error-focused process. Something is growing, being built. (Coyle, 4 pag.)

What if we S…L…O…W… down?

How might we leverage technology to take deliberate, individualized dynamic actions? What will we notice and observe? Can we Will we What happens when we will take time to note what we are noticing and track our thinking?

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What is lost by the time we save being efficient, by telling? How might we ask rather than tell?

#SlowMath Movement = #DeepPractice + #AskDontTell

What if we offer more opportunities to deepen understanding by investigation, inquiry, and deep practice?


Coyle, Daniel (2009-04-16). The Talent Code: Greatness Isn’t Born. It’s Grown. Here’s How. Random House, Inc.. Kindle Edition.

Master of them all: make sense of problems and persevere

In his #CMCS15 session, Michael Serra challenges us to consider:

“Of all the Mathematical Practices, there is one that stands above the others: Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.”

If our learners cannot make sense of tasks and persevere in solving them, will they even find opportunities to experience the other Standards for Mathematical Practices?

What actions do we take to develop and grow a collaborative culture of perseverance?  How might we leverage gaming to foster perseverance, inspire struggle, and promote flexible thinking?

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Can we demonstrate enough self-regulation to hold our solution long enough for our learners to persevere, productively struggle, and find a solution pathway for themselves?

How might we develop a community of learners that, when asked if they’d like a hint, say a loud, resounding NOWe can persevere; we can do it ourselves!

HMW walk the walk: 1st draft doesn’t equal final draft

In her #CMCS15  session, Jessica Balli (@JessicaMurk13) challenges us to consider how we might redefine mathematical proficiency for teachers and students. Are our actions reflecting a current definition or are we holding on to the past?

How might we engage with the Standards for Mathematical Practice to help all redefine what it means to be ‘good at math’?

Do we value process and product? Are we offering opportunities to our learners that cause them to struggle, to grapple with big ideas, to make sense and persevere?

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Do we value our learners’ previous knowledge or do we mistakenly assume that they are blank slates? What if we offer our learners opportunity to show what they know first?  How might we use examples and non-examples to notice and note and then revise?

What if we take up the challenge to walk the walk to prove to our learners (and ourselves) that a first draft is not the same as a final draft?

Mistakes: it’s what you do next…

Mistakes: everybody makes them; the key is what happens next.

In his #CMCS15  session, Making Math Mistakes and Error Analysis: Diamonds in the Rough session, Andrew Stadel (@mr_stadelDivisible by 3, and Estimation 180) challenges us to make our thinking visible and to seize opportunities to deepen understanding.

  • Math mistakes are a valuable window into student thinking
  • Analysis of mistakes can help drive instruction, curb student misconceptions, and strengthen formative assessment.

How might we strength formative assessment to spur action?  Knowing is not enough.  What if we bright spot work found in the mistake to show something was going well?

AndrewStadelCMCS

Do we practice?  How often do we reflect on our struggles? Knowing what went well and where we struggled, how might we consider taking new tack in what we do next?

Do something different… It’s what happens next.

 

 

#TEDTalkTuesday: Brave space a.k.a. turning collisions into connections

Yesterday, I had the privilege of attending a session at GISA on Implicit Bias facilitated by Trinity’s very own Gina Quiñones () and Lauren Kinnard ().

Lauren and Gina began the session by setting norms, challenging us to level up from a safe space to a brave space. How might we dare to be brave enough to express what we think and feel? What if we listen to others to learn?

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They challenged us to consider how might we turn our own cultural collisions into more meaningful connections and shared the following TED talk.

Turning cultural collisions into cultural connections: Nadia Younes at TEDxMontrealWomen

I am grateful to work and learn with brave leaders, and I am thankful for all who trust enough to share brave space.

Developing 21st Century Teachers and Schools (Part II: Schools)

Developing 21st Century Teachers and Schools (Part II: Schools)

What does the cutting edge picture of the new school look like? How does technology fit into this picture? For independent schools that want to design new programs or new educational models, what are today’s exemplars?

John Katzman: The future of schools and school design.

Russ Whitehurst: The challenges we face in rethinking the K12 education model and curricula.

Facilitated discussion (Kim Wargo): Do independent schools need to reinvent themselves to become true 21st century schools and if so, how?

From John Katzman:

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From Russ Whitehurst:

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I am honored to be an invited participant as NAIS gathers a group of expert educators, psychologists, and thought leaders at Vanderbilt University’s Peabody College of Education in Nashville, Tennessee, to discuss advances in the science of learning and what it tells us about teaching, curricula, and schools on May 19-20 for its fourth Deep Dive: NAIS Explores the Science of Learning and 21st Century Schools.