Teachers and Teaching (Part I: Teachers)

Teachers and Teaching (Part I: Teachers)

How can teachers break out of familiar constraints in order to influence school and classroom practice, education policy, and school reform? How do we help teachers make the shift to different teaching methods and paradigms? What’s the impact on teachers, support staff, curriculum, and professional development?

Rick Hess (@rickhess99): Key take-aways from The Cage-Busting Teacher.

Joel Rose (@NCJoelRose): The changing teacher paradigm. Teach to One

 Facilitated discussion (Ruth Fletcher): How is learning and teaching changing in our schools? How are teachers adapting to the changing educational and student landscapes? What are the push-backs and how are they overcome?

From Rick Hess (@rickhess99):

Build opportunities to listen differently, work differently, think differently. Does the playbook change based on talent? When Peyton Manning came onboard, the playbook changed. How do we leverage the talent and experience under our roof?

Environment and culture matters.

Rethink time. Do more of what is working. Close gaps to gain time. Leverage expertise for impact.

What does it look like to rethink? What actions do we take? Teachers are open to things if they feel like they’re part of the design process.

RickHess

From Joel Rose (@NCJoelRose):

How might we teach learners where they are? Teaching something they are not ready for is a waste of time. Teaching something they already know is a waste of time.  Teach what they are ready for, need, and can use now. Open pathways for learning. Make it personal.

Image a different classroom, a different model. Focus on R&D. Currently, lots of research with not a lot of development.  Learn, shift, learn, rethink, remix.

Close gaps to gain time.

Empower teachers to be part of the design process.

JoelRose

Listen to the learner.  Differentiate. Love. Learn with. Co-learning. Co-leading.

How might we holistically rethink what we do, how we learn, the ways we use time?

Lead, learn, partner, collaborate.


I am honored to be an invited participant as NAIS gathers a group of expert educators, psychologists, and thought leaders at Vanderbilt University’s Peabody College of Education in Nashville, Tennessee, to discuss advances in the science of learning and what it tells us about teaching, curricula, and schools on May 19-20 for its fourth Deep Dive: NAIS Explores the Science of Learning and 21st Century Schools.

21st Century Skills and Outcomes

21st Century Skills and Outcomes

If the neuroscience is the how, then what is our vision of the what? What are the skills and other traits we are seeking in our students?

Ken Kay (@kenkay21): 21st century skills and implications for education and learning.

Charles Fadel: Defining education for the 21st century.

Facilitated discussion (Alex Curtis): How are 21st Century Skills and traits being incorporated into learning and teaching practices at our schools? What steps should schools be considering to make this happen? How do we know if we are succeeding?

From Ken Kay (@kenkay21):

How might we blend content, curriculum, processes into the fabric of learning? What if we focus on the C’s (you pick a number of them) as a lens for learning, actions, and growth? What are the actions we take to offer actionable feedback to foster learning and growth?

KenKay

From Charles Fadel:

When revising curriculum to focus on deep learning, use a scalpel not a chainsaw.  We don’t throw out all content. We focus on essentials to go deep to broaden coverage and deepen learning.  Broaden learning experiences that integrate, offer relevance, seek opportunities for personal engagement and experience.

CharlesFadel

Learning is social, collaborative, emotional, personal.

How might we

  • learn and share?
  • offer actionable feedback?
  • focus on what is essential for a learner to learn?
  • deep learning?
  • empower learners?
  • make learning personal?

I am honored to be an invited participant as NAIS gathers a group of expert educators, psychologists, and thought leaders at Vanderbilt University’s Peabody College of Education in Nashville, Tennessee, to discuss advances in the science of learning and what it tells us about teaching, curricula, and schools on May 19-20 for its fourth Deep Dive: NAIS Explores the Science of Learning and 21st Century Schools.

 

 

Neuroscience and the Implications for Learning and Teaching

Neuroscience and the Implications for Learning and Teaching

What does the latest neuro science research tell us about how children learn and what are the implications for schools and teachers? What should teachers and schools do differently and how do we get them to do this?

Mary Helen Immordino-Yang: The most provocative take-aways from learning and neuroscience research.

Joanna Christodoulou (@Joanna22c): The connection between education and cognitive neuroscience as it applies to reading development, difficulties, and intervention.

 Facilitated discussion (Martha Haakmat@marthahaakmat): As a practical matter, how are schools actually using the learning research? How do we encourage schools to integrate this new knowledge?

From Mary Helen Immordino-Yang:

Meaningful learning ALWAYS involves emotion! Learn how to feel and find meaning. Notice and note.  Don’t waste emotion on the irrelevant. Concentrate of the feel in intrinsic power. Emotions are not separate from cognition.

When we thing about learning, we completely miss the fact that knowledge, its usefulness, its application is emotional thought.  It’s in the the overlap between cognitive and affective processing.MaryHelen

From Joanna Christodoulou:

Effective teaching can rewire a brain.  Learners who struggle need alternate learning pathways. It is imperative that we know our learners, meet them where they are, and empower/embolden them to take action to learn.

JoannaChristodoulou


I am honored to be an invited participant as NAIS gathers a group of expert educators, psychologists, and thought leaders at Vanderbilt University’s Peabody College of Education in Nashville, Tennessee, to discuss advances in the science of learning and what it tells us about teaching, curricula, and schools on May 19-20 for its fourth Deep Dive: NAIS Explores the Science of Learning and 21st Century Schools.

 

 

Summer Reading using VTR: Sentence-Phrase-Word

Reading nonfiction. Close reading of nonfiction.

How do we annotate the text, look for patterns, and ask questions to engage deeply when reading?

Tracking content using imagery, color, word pictures and typography can change the way you understand information and also dramatically increase your level of knowledge and retention. (Brown, n. pag.)

How do we engage with and make meaning and connections from text? How might we notice and note the big ideas from a text to capture what speaks to us?

How do we show and share what we are thinking? What if we use the Sentence-Phrase-Word visible thinking routine as we read this summer?

Screen Shot 2015-05-12 at 7.14.20 PM Screen Shot 2015-05-12 at 7.25.04 PM

…the power and promise of this routine lies in the discussion of why a particular word, a single phrase, and a sentence stood out for each individual in the group as the catalyst for rich discussion. It is in these discussions that learners must justify their choices and explain what it was that spoke to them in each of their choices. (Ritchhart, 207 pag.)

What might we learn when we discuss what speaks to us?


Brown, Sunni. The Doodle Revolution: Unlock the Power to Think Differently. New York: Portfolio/Penguin, 2014. Print.

Brown, Sunni. “VISUAL NOTE-TAKING 101 / PERSONAL INFODOODLING™.” Visual Thinking/Literacy/Gaming/Facilitation for a Smarter World. Sunni Brown, n.d. Web. 12 May 2015.

How to Do a Close Reading.” Harvard College Writing Center. Harvard Writing Project, n.d. Web. 12 May 2015.

Ritchhart, Ron, Mark Church, and Karin Morrison. Making Thinking Visible: How to Promote Engagement, Understanding, and Independence for All Learners. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, 2011. Print.

Doodling: concentrating, sifting, generating, focusing

I have been experimenting with doodling, a.k.a. sketch noting, seriously since August, 2015.  You can see my growth, setbacks, and learning on my Pinterest page MyLearning Journey for #ShowYourWork Doodles and Sketch notes.

A doodler is connecting neurological pathways with previously disconnected pathways. A doodler is concentrating intently, sifting though information, conscious, and otherwise, and – much more often than we realize – generating massive insights. (Brown, 11 pag.)

How might we practice, experience, and engage in a different way of connecting with information? What if we exercise our own creativity to create visuals of what we are learning?

TKanold-MathatPLC-Pasadena_JGough[1]

Sketch notes from Tim Kanold's April 29 session in Pasadena, CA.  See Seven Stages of Team Collaboration worksheet for support of 7 stages doodle.

Rather than diverting our attention away from a topic (what our culture believe is happening when people doodle), doodling can serve as an anchoring task – a task that can occur simultaneously with another task – and act as a preemptive measure to keep us from losing focus on [a] topic. (Brown, 18 pag.)

It seems counterintuitive, but I can attest to my own improvement in focus, attention, and engagement.

People using even rudimentary visual langue to understand or express something are stirring the neurological pathways of the mind to see a topic in a new light. (Brown, 71 pag.)

Yes, it takes practice.  Yes, it is difficult at first.

Isn’t that true of most learning?

Experiment. Learn by doing.

Be brave; #ShowYourWork.

And… have fun!


Brown, Sunni. The Doodle Revolution: Unlock the Power to Think Differently. New York: PORTFOLIO/Penguin, 2014. Print.

Gough, Jill. “MyLearning Journey for #ShowYourWork Doodles and Sketch Notes.” Pinterest. N.p., n.d. Web. 06 May 2015.

productive struggle vs. thrashing blindly

The trick is to choose a goal just beyond your present abilities; to target the struggle. Thrashing blindly doesn’t help. Reaching does. (Coyle, 19 pag.)

What if we teach how to reach? How might we offer targeted struggle for every learner in our care?

SMP-1: Make Sense of Problems and Persevere #LL2LU

Investing time in teaching students how to learn is never wasted; in doing so, you deepen their understanding of the upcoming content and better equip them for future success. (Jackson, 19 pag.)

SMP-8: Look for and Express Regularity in Repeated Reasoning #LL2LU

If we are to harness the power of feedback to increase student learning, then we need to ensure that feedback causes a cognitive rather than an emotional reaction—in other words, feedback should cause thinking. It should be focused; it should relate to the learning goals that have been shared with the students; and it should be more work for the recipient than the donor. (Wiliam, 130 pag.)

Math Flexibility

When people believe their basic qualities can be developed, failures may still hurt, but failures don’t define them.   And if abilities can be expanded – if change and growth are possible – then there are still many paths to success.” (Dweck, 39 pag.)

What pathways to learning are illuminated in order to highlight learning = struggle + perseverance?


Coyle, Daniel (2009-04-16). The Talent Code: Greatness Isn’t Born. It’s Grown. Here’s How. Random House, Inc. Kindle Edition.

Dweck, Carol S. Mindset: the New Psychology of Success. New York: Random House, 2006. 39. Print.

Jackson, Robyn R. (2010-07-27). How to Support Struggling Students (Mastering the Principles of Great Teaching series) (Pages 18-19). Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development. Kindle Edition.

Wiliam, Dylan (2011-05-01). Embedded Formative Assessment (Kindle Locations 2679-2681). Ingram Distribution. Kindle Edition.

struggle + perseverance = learning

How are we facilitating experience where learners can risk and grow in sense making and perseverance?  We want every learner to be able to say:

I can make sense of tasks and persevere in solving them.

An important and powerful aspect of teachers’ practice concerns the ways in which they treat mistakes in mathematics classrooms. Research has shown that mistakes are important opportunities for learning and growth, but students routinely regard mistakes as indicators of their own low ability. (Boaler, n. pag.)

Do we teach mistakes as opportunities to learn? What if we slow down – pause – to reflect on what didn’t work well and plan a new tact?

In analyzing a series of setbacks, a key question to ask is Am I failing differently each time? “If you keep making the same mistakes again and again,” the IDEO founder David Kelley has observed, “you aren’t learning anything. If you keep making new and different mistakes, that means you are doing new things and learning new things.”(Berger, 124 pag.)

How might we take up the challenge to focus on learning? What if we teach the importance of struggle?

Struggle is not optional—it’s neurologically required: in order to get your skill circuit to fire optimally, you must by definition fire the circuit suboptimally; you must make mistakes and pay attention to those mistakes; you must slowly teach your circuit. You must also keep firing that circuit—i.e., practicing—in order to keep myelin functioning properly. After all, myelin is living tissue. (Coyle, 43-44 pag.)

I can make sense of tasks and persevere in solving them.

How might we amplify the important practice of how we treat mistakes? What if we teach and learn how to pay attention to mistakes and how to change based on what we learn?

What pathways to learning are illuminated in order to highlight learning = struggle + perseverance?

What if we slow down to focus on learning?


Berger, Warren (2014-03-04). A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas . BLOOMSBURY PUBLISHING. Kindle Edition.

Boaler, Jo. “Ability and Mathematics: The Mindset Revolution That Is Reshaping Education.” Forum 55.1 (2013): 143. FORUM: For Promoting 3-19 Comprehensive Education. SYMPOSIUM BOOKS Ltd, 2013. Web. 2015.

Coyle, Daniel (2009-04-16). The Talent Code: Greatness Isn’t Born. It’s Grown. Here’s How. Random House, Inc.. Kindle Edition.

Seeking brightspots and dollups of feedback about learning and growth.

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